Identifying moments that matter through customer journey mapping

Focus on people- their lives, their work, their dreams. – Google design principle

Nice idea. But how exactly do we translate this into creating compelling user experiences?

We in the UX world used to talk about digital journeys and joining up the different touchpoints in those journeys for better customer experiences.  But now we need to go beyond just the ‘Digital’ journey and be aware of all the touchpoints or interactions our customer have with our products; whether it be digital or physical, or on-line or off. Only then will we get a better understanding of how customers engage with our brand and how other events in their lives impact that engagement.  Only then that we can take a step closer to understanding their dreams.

How can we get this understanding?  Walk a mile in our customers’ shoes
What we need to know about our customers:

  • What are they doing with our product? The basics; How and when do customers engage with us; how many times and which product features do they use when. What is a typical journey? Is it all online or does some of it happen in store etc.? Which device to they use for each particular part of the journey?
  • How did they get there? What were they doing beforehand that led them to our product; what were the triggers? And what did they do, where did they go, afterwards?
  • What other products/services are they using? The most common user experience is a multi-site one. What other tabs has your customer got open while engaging with your website or what else are they doing on their mobile phone? What other products is your brand competing with? What else is competing for your user’s attention?
  • What are your customers doing in social media? Never before has our online identity been so closely connected with our personal identify. What we say or do online represents what we stand for; what we believe in or don’t believe in. How are your customers engaging with your brand through social media?
  • What are they doing off-line? Very few services exist in a vacuum online these days. Successful companies are the ones who understand their customers’ offline experience and how best to meld this with their online services.  It’s interesting to note that even Amazon, one of the biggest online companies in the world has recently opened up a ‘bricks and mortar’ store. What is going on, off-line that is impacting your customer’s experience?
  • What are your customers thinking and feeling? We may all consider ourselves rational beings but when it boils down to it, its emotion that we all base alot of our decisions on.  How do your customers feel when using your product? Which parts of the journey elicit the most emotion? And is it good or bad? Where are these ‘moments of truth’ in the journey; moments that elicit that emotion?  And what can you do about them?
  • What parts of the experience is working well and which are not?  Which parts of your customer journey is working well and which parts are not? Are there any areas in the journey where something is broken, incomplete or missing? Or is there some interesting activity happening in an area you were unaware of – a ‘white space’ somewhere, that can provide opportunity for creativity and growth?
moments of truth.jpg
Moments of Truth

How to… join up the dots…

We have in our UX Tool box, a host of different methods such as Customer Journey maps, Personas, empathy maps etc. which can help us describe what is going on in our customers’ lives.   Using these to describe and map what is going on is useful because:

  • It helps us start thinking about our customers and their experience in a more holistic way
  • It allows us interrogate how our organisational goals align with customer needs and identify gaps
  • It helps draw out and share company knowledge about customers, which we can then test/add to by research
  • It affords us a better understanding of the customer experience and in particular areas that are not working so well. This helps us identify areas for improvement and  innovation
  • It provides useful visualisations of who are customers are and what their experience is like, which we can share and discuss.   This helps keep the customer at the forefront of decision making

Useful resources on mapping your customer journey. 

Google and how to start thinking about ‘Micro moments’

UX Mastery on how to create a Customer Journey map

How to run an Empathy & User Journey Mapping Workshop from Harry Brignull

How we do it at User Vision

Moving towards more compelling user experiences.  Understanding “Moments that matter” 
We need to think about:

  • Moving away from product thinking to consider the whole experience.  According to Air Bnb Head of Design Alex Schleifer, “You need to bring your tool forward when it’s most needed, and hide it when it’s not. And then you need to build the transition from the digital world to the real world”.
  • Moving away from thinking about interactions and understand more about the emotional connection you can create.   What are the ‘moments of truth’ or “moments that matter” in your customers’ experiences.   How can you own that moment, what value can you add?
  • Moving away from digital first and even mobile first design thinking, to thinking ‘context’ first.     Really understanding what is going on when customers engage with our products and empathising with their needs at different stages of that journey will help us design products and experiences that  truly connect to our customers lives and dreams.

Travel and the passenger experience

Travel through the ages.

Back in the 60’s it took my mother at least a month of her wages as a secretary to get a flight to London for the weekend. 20 years ago when I first worked in London, a flight back to Dublin was approx. £200, about a week’s salary.  Fast forward to today and a flight from Edinburgh to Dublin usually costs me about £40, which could be an hour’s salary.  A change for the positive.

picture of airplane
The travel industry has been revolutionised over the last 30 years, thanks to the likes of Ryanair (and perhaps Easyjet to some extent). Frequent flights and low costs have not only changed how people can travel but also how people can work and live. It’s made it possible for me to live in Edinburgh but travel back to Dublin regularly while not breaking the bank. And flights are pretty well organised too.

As a UX consultant, I am interested in process and how technology can improve and enrich our lives. I have always found the airline industry a fascinating one. An airport is a busy place with its own unique challenges; scheduling of flights, security issues, managing the ebb and flow of people on the ground and dealing with customers from all over the world, all contained in one, often stressful, environment. Efficiencies in process save time and money and improve the customer experience. New and better technologies such as mobile apps and improved booking and check in processes save time and effort.

Ryanair logo I can’t talk about changes to the travel industry without mentioning Ryanair, who have grown from a small Irish Airline founded 30 years ago to one of the biggest, if not the biggest, airline in Europe.  Set to carry 100 million passengers this year they have been the biggest disruptors of the airline industry in Europe.  And they have forced others to follow their lead.

So why didn’t I like them?
Up until about 2 years ago I, and almost everyone else I knew, didn’t particularly like flying Ryanair. Of course I liked their prices but not the stress that came with flying with them.  They were cut throat, and would pounce on every opportunity to make a buck out of their customers; late check in, extra bags/weight, on board selling etc.  I was in a panic even before I reached the airport.  And it was well known that they were notoriously mean and penny pinching with their own staff too.  Not a brand you wanted to engage with.

ryan air with cross sign

The tipping point
Ryanair’s aggressive policies finally came to a head about 4 years ago. According to newspaper reports, it involved a particularly insensitive and bad PR incident where Ryanair charged a man to change his flights back to the UK. A man who had just learned his family had burned to death in a house fire. CEO Michael O’Leary vowed to change Ryanair policies.  A noble gesture perhaps but no doubt falling profits at the airline at the time helped him make this decision.

I too had noticed this tipping point but in other ways; friends and colleagues said they would rather pay up to £50 extra to fly with someone else. Not even low costs or on-time flights could combat our dislike of Ryanair.

Change was in the air
Ryanair stepped up their investment in technology and people and a new raft of policies followed.  Changes included small things like being able to take a handbag on board, shortening the on-line checking to 2 hours. Even cutting out some of those annoying tannoy adverts on late flights really does make a difference.  And they got rid of the trumpet on landing. Thank God.

These changes have had a positive impact for me personally and the lifestyle I lead.

Getting here from there
So how did Ryanair achieve this miraculous transformation? To me, as an external but obviously interested observer, it appears that they chose to examine the experience as a whole, explore where the pain points were in the user journey and make them go away.Addressing these pain points or ‘moments of truth’ can really make or break people’s engagement with a brand.

Of course Ryanair’s investment in technology has helped hugely. Investment not only in new planes but also in the new Ryanair Innovation labs in Dublin and with this a shift of focus onto the user experience.

The introduction of their mobile App about 2 years ago was a good start, although I still prefer Easyjet’s and British Airways’ Apps in terms of a seamless experience. Hopefully we will see a new improved mobile App from Ryanair soon.
And they have just launched a redesigned site, more good news for the customer. Although I haven’t booked a flight on the new site yet, I have had a quick look and my first impressions, in terms of design and new features, are positive.
Some thoughts from my preliminary foray onto the new Ryanair site…

Improved Homepage and Navigation 

Image of ryan air homepage

  • Top menu is simple and straightforward with, it seems, sensible labels. This acts as a useful signpost and makes it easy to find stuff.
  • Easy to see and interact with the flights section (the old site drove me mad when I had selected Dublin as a destination from the drop down and it didn’t pick it up).
  • But I’m not sure about the huge £15 red banner. Eye tracking research and Fitt’s law tell us that a huge image like this really dominates the user’s attention when first looking at this page. Okay so it is a MASSIVE sale (I get it!) and the first time you see it might be okay but it would really annoy me after a while.

Yay! I can create an account and save myself time and fuss in booking my flights 

create an account

  • I’m not 100% sure I couldn’t log in in the old site. I don’t think so – it certainly was not obvious or easy to do. I was therefore very happy to easily spot the myRyanair section of the new site where I assumed I could create an account
  • In the myRyanair section, I also like the list of benefits on the left. A sensible place to have these benefits and they are easily scannable.
  • The ‘Create an account’ functionality appears really straightforward too. And I can choose to ‘Show’ password; a good design convention and especially important on mobile.
    But then I ran into some issues…

reminder password

  • The system already recognised me, so I requested a new password, which was easy.  So easy in fact that I ended up requesting it three times.  This was because I hadn’t realised that it had been requested already. Once I pressed the ‘Send Email’ button nothing happened. The system failed to tell me I had completed the action so I kept repeating it.

captcha example

  • I was also interested to see how Ryanair handled the Captcha, a notoriously difficult element to get right. It’s hard to strike a balance between preventing spamming and annoying the customer. I was not sure how Captcha works here but I pressed the tick button anyway thinking ‘this is easy’. Not so.
  • Because I then got booted out of the site and was told ‘code already in use’. What? Not a great start after all. Mind you when I tried to log in again, the system recognised my email and my new password so something must have worked.

In summary I would say, bar a couple of quirks in the login process, my first impressions of the new site are good.  I look forward to investigating more.  And hopefully a new mobile App is in the not too distance future. Improvements in technology along with Ryanair’s change in attitude and a focus on customer service have no doubt been a large contributor to a change in their fortunes. Recent reports show that the airline’s share price has more than doubled since January 2014.  No wonder Ryanair are flying high these days.    Of course cheap flights and efficient on-time services are important too.

Keep going Michael, sure it’s all going grand now.

Blog post published on the Uservision website.

12 thoughts on creativity

Blog post originally published on User Vision website.

Creativity has been a hot topic at two UX conferences I attended recently here in the UK and in the US.

It seems that as UX Professionals in an ever increasing complex world we can get caught up in everyday life and dealing with ‘business as usual’. Sometimes it can be hard to tap into our creative selves and come up with new ideas and perspectives on how to approach our work.

So what did I learn about how can we invite more creativity into our lives?

  1. Make time for creativity. Figure out when you feel the most creative during the day and allow yourself time to be creative during that period. For me, like a lot of people, this is morning time. Some reports say creativity is heightened in the morning because the prefrontal cortex is more active at that time.
  2. Practice makes perfect. Thinking creatively does not happen like a bolt out of the blue (unless you are Einstein), but rather it is like a muscle that needs to be trained. The more time you spend thinking creatively, the stronger that muscle gets.
  3. Create habits and routines to kick start the process. Repeated routines such as that morning cup of tea, listening to music, or meditating can help you get into a creative mood quicker.
  4. Get physical. Not only can exercise help you de-stress from everyday problems, it can also help get you into a more relaxed mental state which allows you to be more creative.imagination quote
  5. Turn the TV off. It is slightly ironic that in order for us to be more creative and come up with innovative ideas around technology, the advice is to switch off all that technology. As mentioned at the conference, it is no coincidence that the best ideas can come when you are in the shower, as there are no screens in there to distract.
  6. Be more “Single-focused”. Attention and creative thoughts can often be fractured by trying to focus on too many things at the same time. In fact, studies from the University of London show that multitasking can make your IQ drop temporarily. Switch off those notifications during your creative period.
  7. Don’t force it. Often new ideas and thoughts are percolating just below the surface in your subconscious and can be hard to reach. But keep with it. Giving yourself time to live with a problem can inspire new solutions. One helpful suggestion was to write down a list of questions you are interested in and keep it with you. This approach will keep thoughts bubbling around in the back of your mind and help surface those new ideas.
  8. Keep learning and build your memory. Learning and memory exercises can sharpen your creative muscles. Challenge yourself with puzzles, read more fiction, and get your brain working in new ways.
  9. Find new ways to organise your thoughts. You may not know yet how the dots are going to join up, but keeping up to date – and in particular, keeping abreast of new technologies – can disrupt old ways of thinking and stimulate new ideas. I use the tool Evernote to capture and record items of interest.
  10. Observe people and their habits. How do your customers use your products? Why do they do what they do? What else are they doing? Having a better understanding of how your customers engage with your products and how those products fit in with their lives allows you to spot areas for innovation.
  11. Do different things. As Einstein purportedly said: Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. If you want to achieve different outcomes we need to change our behaviour and try new things. Making new connections or joining new networks can stimulate creative thinking. Be bold, try different approaches or strategies.
  12. Be kind to yourself. Don’t be so quick to shoot down your ideas. Turn off the self-criticism and let those ideas flow. The first idea may not be best one but it’s the start of the journey

Take a deep breath. It’s time to invent the Future.

References/Resources

Keynotes from:

  • Dan Saffer of Jawbone @odannyboy
  • Neema Moarveji of Spire @moraveji

The Creative Habit by Twyla Tharp

 

The Internet is watching you

With every digital move we make, someone somewhere, is monitoring that activity.

As consumers, we understand to some degree, that this is happening.  Sites like Amazon have been using personal data to make recommendations etc. for some time now. In fact, we are used to being asked questions when we set up profiles and want the information returned be personalised towards our preferences.  We expect sites to remember who we are and what we like.

picture of good v evil
From NJ on Flickr

But do we, as digital users understand how much of our personal information is being tracked and all the purposes it is being used for? And as UX professionals, where do we draw the line between using customer data to create a better user experience and using it to influence user behaviour?

Smart Data

Tracking user data across services and using it to shape the way users engage with products and services is transforming user experiences as we know them.

Take Google for example and how they mine data across apps and services.  Recently when I logged into Google maps the addressfield was pre-populated with an address a friend had recentlytexted me. And Bingo, this was exactly the address I was about to search for.  Google had put 2 and 2 together and come up with 5.

We can see more and more examples of this context related or ‘Just in time ‘data when the right information is presented to the user at the right time and in just the right context.  Often predicting what the user would like to do next and making it easier and quicker for them to do so.

This makes for a quicker more efficient user experience.

Targeted data

We know that User tracking allows companies to target advertising and marketing based on their users’ online activity such as browsing history and search.  Research we undertook at Paddypower showed us that when adverts were shown in context and were relevant to users’ interests, users were less likely even to register that it was an advert but rather saw the marketing as useful information.  A recent example I have seen of this is the Lynda.com. With LinkedIn’s recent acquisition of online training giant Lynda.com they are now able to target learners with more relevant courses based on data mined from users’ LinkedIn activity such as their network or what groups they follow.

Darker Data

Personal Data is big business.

As consumers we regularly input and share our personal information online.  This is generally done in good faith and we expect our information to be both safe and used in an ‘appropriate’ manner. We don’t expect the companies to re-use this information to blatantly retarget us and upsell their products or services. Or worse yet, we don’t expect them to resell or pass on our data to ‘marketing partners’ and/or others.  Take Facebook’s covert ‘emotional research’ project last year, were 1000s of users were unwittingly test research subjects without their knowledge and consent. This provoked an outcry against their unethical use of personal data.

Facebook comprised their users’ trust in their brand. A foolish move when Trust is such a strong currency online. Being upfront and transparent about data collection policies will be paramount in building future loyal customer databases.

Google data policy
Google Data Policy

How can data help us invent the future?

In the Internet of Everything, data will help us to:

  • Create seamless ‘technology ecosystems’; joined up smart experiences across different devices,  platforms and networks
  • Provide just in time, contextual data which will make products and services more pertinent and accessible
  • Harness the power of new technologies that will become more invisible and allow the user to focus more on the experience
  • Build brands that users can identify with, and trust

Not only can we as user experience professionals improve experiences, but smart data will allow us to re-invent those experiences so that they are more immediate, seamless and relevant to our users’ everyday lives.

Keeping on top of it all

The Internet of Everything…

There is so much information out there these days and so many different ways to engage with, I sometimes struggle to keep up with all.  With so many discussions, articles, courses, stories etc. it can be easy to end up clicking on everything and learning nothing.

No matter how busy I am, I think it is important to take a little time to ‘Sharpen the Saw’ as Stephen Covey put it, that is take a little time for yourself and learn from the wisdom of others. Here are a few of my regular go-to links and sources which help me keep up to date.

USER EXPERIENCE

logo UX Design WeeklyUX Design Weekly is described as “ subscribe for free to a hand picked list of the best user experience design links every week. Curated by Kenny Chen and published every Friday.

Why not take advantage of someone else spending time to pull together the latest updates in the UX world and usefully, there are usually updates on the latest UX testing tools included in the update too.

UX matters logo

UX Matters aims to “provide insights and inspiration to both professionals working in all aspects of user experience” . Brought together and edited by professionals in the UX industry, the articles provided are a great way to keep up to date on latest ideas and discussions around UX Strategy, Research and Design.

User testing logo

User Testing provide remote usability testing services. They also have a blog which is well worth signing up to.  Not only do they have some great articles on the benefits of UX and tips on carrying out UX Research but also some interesting posts on latest Design techniques.

MOTIVATIONAL 

ted talks logo

Ted Talks is run by the private non-profit Sapling Foundation, under the slogan “Ideas Worth Spreading” TED  Talks online videos offer plenty of ideas and inspiration.    With colourful presenters talking on a range of topics from business to science to entertainment, a Ted Talk is a perfect 20 minute break at lunchtime.

Daniel GolemanDeepak Chopra

Having been a fan of Daniel Goleman and Deepak Chopra for a while, I was delighted when I discovered their blogs on Linkedin.  Among others things, they offer great articles on how to maintain a healthy work life balance.  I particularly like concepts they discuss around How to maintain Flow, How to become a better Leader and tips on how to become more Focused. In an every increasingly complex world, their perspectives and ideas around mindfulness and mediation and how these can be used to help us work smarter, are welcome.

UX Strategy Part II – Where does UX fit in and who does it belong to?

UX Strategy continues to be a hot topic in our consultancy world.

More and more businesses now appreciate that building a user experience capability in their organisation is no longer a nice to have but rather a must have. They understand that sound UX policies and practices are essential not only in developing better products but also in driving innovation and growth.  In a previous blog I shared some of my tips on how organisations could start thinking about implementing UX in their companies.  In this blog I would like to focus on two key questions that keep coming up when we are discussing Strategy with clients.

  • Where and How does UX Strategy fit in within the overall business strategy?
  • Who does the UX Strategy belong to? Who has overall responsibility for the final user experience?

Where does UX fit in?

An interesting question arose at a recent presentation by my colleague Stephen Denning who was talking about UX Strategy:

  • Question: Should the UX Strategy be separate from the overall Digital Strategy or even the Customer Strategy for that matter?

Some UX experts such as Jeff Gothelf say no.  He contends “that there is no such thing as UX strategy. There is only product strategy”.

Or perhaps UX Strategy should just be part of the overall Business Strategy and focus on objectives such as putting the customer first etc.?

  • Answer:  My view is  that having a set of UX principles or Vision that clearly articulates what UX means to your company is an important part of establishing a culture of UX within the business. Especially if a company is at the beginning of their UX Journey.

Of course it is important that the UX Vision is connected to a company’s business objectives and that it reflects the core values of a business.    Often when we are working with companies to help them develop their UX Strategy, we use Morville’s Honeycomb as a framework to help them map out what the different elements of UX could mean in terms of their situation.

morville honeycomb of UX
Morville Honeycomb of UX

Who owns the User Experience?

Another interesting question or rather debate, that we often come across is about ownership of the user experiences.

  • Question: Who has overall responsibility (and the ability to make decisions on) the final product features and user experience e.g should it be the Product Manager or the UX Manager/Designer?
two foxes fighting
from flicker D Kingham

Often when UX teams start out they are not given a huge amount of influence or authority over decisions which impact the product or the final user experiences.  This can be especially true in an Agile working environment where the buck stops with the Product Manager who makes all final decisions.

  • Answer:  It depends on the structure within the organisation.  However in my experience teamwork and collaboration within the product team are the keys to success.  The UX Team, Product Managers and specialists such as Head of Mobile etc need to learn to work together in a way that is best for that business.  Defined roles and responsibilities are an important part of making this happen.  And creating practices that support communication and collaboration at all stages of development.

We do see however, that in more mature UX organisations the UX team having more influence over the direction of development. This is often reflected in level of seniority of the UX Team has in these organisations.  And this is reflected also in the emphasis and the energy those companies put into promoting a culture of User Centred Design within their company.

Myself and my colleague Stephen will be talking some more about UX Strategy in two upcoming Conferences.

UX Scotland in Edinburgh, 11-12 June.

UXPA 2015 in San Diego, California, 22-25 June.

 

 

New Year. New Learning

This January I have been inundated with emails about learning opportunities from organisations like Coursera, Udemy and Lynda.  What is really interesting is the type of targeted programmes they are sending me; Programming and IT, Leadership and Innovation and even Equine Nutrition (how did they know I used to work on a horse stud farm?).  These emails and the fact that it is January made me reflect on:

What type of learning I should think about doing and also what type of learning is necessary for the industry I work in, the so called ‘Flat White Economy’?

The Flat White Economycoffee  

Forgot your soya lattes, Flat White’s are where it is at these days.  Or rather the ‘Flat White Economy’, a term describing those coffee loving hipsters from London who work in the Media, Internet and Creative (MIC) sector.  A sector which is set to increase London’s growth rate over the next five years to 15.4pc according to the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR).  This will reinstate London as the UK’s fastest growing region.

Of course these industries are essential in driving innovation and growth in the rest of the UK too,   So what  types of skills and behaviour do we need to need learners and workers to adopt to support this growth?

  • An interest In technology. Obviously. Much of this economy is driven on (new) technology and of course we need coders and programmers. Not everyone needs to be technical but they do need an understanding of different types of technology and how different systems work together. BTW teenagers spending 5 hours online on social apps and messaging does not count.
  • Being able to put yourself in someone else’s shoes and understand the world from their perspective.  A great example of this University Warwick Business Programme where students take on different roles in Shakespeare Plays to better understand the world from different characters’ viewpoints.
  • Being good at fostering and building relationships. With clients, within teams and with all different levels of stakeholders within the business. This is especially important to maintain as more of our work is being conducted remotely and over the internet. Never underestimate the power of asking someone to go for a coffee to chat about a project.

quote socrates

  •  Being Curios and interested in what is going on. Questioning why things or processes work the way they do and thinking about ways to improve them. Creativity is not always about something new but rather is new ways of looking at old problems and being smarter about how we solve them.
  • Closely aligned to curiosity is the ability to define and solve problems creatively.  As I mentioned in a previous blog looking at different definitions of intelligence, one researcher closely linked being smart to how quickly a person can take in information and grasp the complexity of the situation.  And of course having the imagination to come up with creative insights and solutions.

  •  Embracing Lifelong Learning and recognising that we could always benefit from more learning. This is about being reflective, open to feedback and curios about the world.
  • Being Adventures.  To learn by doing, succeed by failing.  To be up for giving it a shot and not giving up when it does not succeed the first time.  Always testing our own assumptions. Learning and Improving.
  • Flexibility (and Trust) and the willingness to work within new situations and jobs that are increasing no longer just 9 to 5 or even office based.

Of course its not just learners and employees who need to think about what skills they need to embrace for the future. Management in our educational systems and workplaces need to think too about how they will encourage and support this skills and behaviours to create that climate of innovation and growth.

Looking for Love. Online

User Experience and online dating 

A recent study from the University of Chicago contends that more than a third of those who married in the US between 2005 and 2012 met online.  Match.com says one in four relationships now starts on the web.  And according to eHarmony the relationships that started on their site last longer.and have a much lower divorce rate than the national average. It seems that online dating is not only the norm nowadays, it could just be the way to go.

And its big business. One report estimated that globally the industry is now worth more than   £2 billion pounds

And  as someone who is interested in human behavior and how technology can enhance our lives; it would seem that online dating offers the perfect match between human needs and technical advancement.  And what a great use of technology, making it easier for people to connect with each other.   It would appear the potential for this  industry to flourish is endless.   However online dating is not without  heartaches of its own in the form of recent scandals and intense competition.

broken heart

Scandal 

Online dating firms have faced a barrage of negative publicity  in recent years and have been accused of skulduggery in many forms such as of selling off on-line profiles, fake flirting and conducting experiments on unsuspecting users, to name but a few.

The need for dating firms to build a good reputation and a brand that users can trust is now more essential than ever.

And competition online these days is fierce.  There seems to be a plethora of dating sites out there catering for anything from Theatre lovers to  My little pony aficionados who want to find their ‘brony mate‘.

Exponential growth in the web brings with it,   its own trials too in form of indirect competition from platforms such as Facebook and Meetup who provide opportunity and in many cases, free, alternatives to meeting a partner online.

The challenge for those in the dating industry  now is to create products and experiences that add value in some way.  That offer something above and beyond the rest.  Something that makes their product stand out from crowd.

2 pl;us 2

Some of the firms I think  have been very successful in carving their niche in the market in the last couple of years are companies like eHarmony with their matching algorithms,  Grindr and Blendr with their use of mobile and location based services  and Tinder and their use Facebook data, to name but a few.

Other dating firms  are hot on their heels and employing strategies such as:

  • Merging online and offline experiences;  Crossing over from offering an online dating service only to include offline events such as themed dating events and real life matchmakers etc.
  • Creating better experiences across multiple platforms:  Predictions are by 2018, more than 80% of the population will own a smartphone.  This has an impact on how users engage with services and dating firms have to look at how to best optimize their product across different devices.
  • Creating compelling ‘sticky’ user experiences. Naturally.  In such a competitive market, the firms who create user- centred services that customers actually enjoy engaging with,  are bound to be the most successful ones.

These are useful strategies to keep up with competition but are they enough to stay ahead of the curve.  Enough to survive? 

The Innovators Dilemma 

In an industry with such low barriers to entry (you don’t even need your own database these days) I believe the biggest challenge to online dating firms is falling foul of what Clayton Christensen called the  ‘Innovators Dilemma ‘~ when new technology causes great firms to fail.    Firms don’t fail because they do something wrong.  They fail because they stand still.   And new ideas and new technologies come along and take their business away.

Enter User Insights .  User insights and design research are not just essential in creating superior customer experiences but also in driving innovation.

picture of heart

It is only by truly understanding our customers’ needs and motivations and how our product fits (or doesn’t fit in) into their lives can we come up with the ideas for new, better products and services.  And it is only by fostering a culture of experimentation and continuos  research and testing can we create experiences that connect people in more meaningful and ultimately more successful ways.

 

What the *UX! User Experience Strategy

How to start thinking about UX Strategy in your Company 

Having been involved in usability and the user experience industry for almost 10 years; it has been interesting to observe how awareness of user experience has grown and how the industry has changed and matured somewhat over the years.

Having moved from setting up usability lab and selling the benefits of usability testing to then becoming part of 14 strong mature UX team in a large company, I had assumed that most companies now understand UX and have established UX practices. Not so. In fact, in my current role as an UX consultant we speak to many companies who are just at the beginning of their UX Journey. They look to us for support in setting up UX processes within their organisations and advice on how they can encourage a culture of UX within their company.  Below are some of my tips on how to start thinking about UX in your company.

diagram of UX strategy
HelloErik Experience Design

Developing a UX Strategy 

    1. Know your current practice: where you are at the moment and where you are not. Take a honest look at current processes and highlight any barriers or broken linkages within your department/organisation.  These are all opportunities to improve.
    2. Measures: Take stock of what measures and KPI’s you are using to monitor and measure success.  Understand what success means in different contexts.
    3. Create a shared understanding of UX: What it means to you and your team and what you think it should mean to your organisation as a whole.  How can it help everyone achieve business goals?  Create and communicate a shared UX Vision.
    4. Get training on knowledge gaps: To help you start with sound UX practices and processes right from the beginning.
    5. Create a plan: of where you want to get to and how you are going to get there.  Lobby business partners for support
    6. Allocate a budget; no matter how small, do not try and start ‘on the cheap’ testing or research.  Commit to running robust quality UX processes that are worth investing in.
    7. Start small; Pick one project where you have a good relationship with the business team and use that to pilot a new process.
    8. Celebrate successes: Show the business what you have done in your wireframes or customer research, show them the processes or insights (particularly if video of customer feedback) and how the product has changed as a result

        “A usability test can produce all wonders of information, yet if the people making the design decisions aren’t aware of what happened, the test has failed”    Steve Krug

    9. Paint the office walls: with UX artifacts such as wireframes, designs, principles, customer feedback.  It is amazing how interested in UX your visitors will become.
    10. Leave your defensiveness at the door and  embrace a culture of  trial and error. Both with your designs and your testing methodologies.  As researchers we see all feedback as learning which not only helps improve our UX methods but also the overall user experience.

And finally remember, take heart…

miracles